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Alumni

Mark HENG

 

Mark HENG

Mark is a Research Officer with the NSC, and also works with the Regional Social and Cultural Studies Programme, and the Thailand Studies Programme. He recently graduated from University College London with an MSc in Urban Studies (2016), which he pursued on ISEAS’ Tun Dato Sir Cheng-Lock Tan M.A. Scholarship. He also holds a BSocSci (Hons) in Geography from the National University of Singapore (2015), and is an alumnus of the University Scholars Programme. His research interests lie in cultural geography and urban studies, with projects focusing primarily on the urban, urbanisation, and urbanism in Mainland Southeast Asia, and significant fieldwork experience in Myanmar (in Yangon) and Thailand (around Chiang Mai).

 

Dr SHOW Ying Ruo

 

SHOW Ying Ruo

Dr Show Ying Ruo is a Visiting Fellow at NSC since July 2017. She received her PhD in Chinese Studies from National University of Singapore (2017) and M.A from SOAS, London (2010). Her PhD thesis explores the vernacular expression and gendered narrative in Chinese religious corpus Baojuan (Precious Scrolls). She is interested in the historical trajectory of lay Buddhist movement and local configurations of religious ideas, ritual practices and texts. She is currently working on a manuscript examining Buddhist linkage and transregional religious network in Southeast Asia through the study of a specific kind of Chinese temple, the Vegetarian Hall (zhaitang).

 

Tana LI

 

Tana LI

Dr Tana Li is Visiting Senior Fellow at NSC. She is currently a senior fellow at the College of Asia and Pacific Studies, the Australian National University. She is interested in maritime and environmental histories of Vietnam and southern China, from the 2nd BCE to the late 19th centuries. Her works includes The Nguyen Cochinchina (SEAP, Cornell 1998); Water Frontier: Commerce and the Chinese in the Lower Mekong Region, 1750-1880 (co-ed with Cooke, 2004), Gulf of Tongking Through History (Co-ed. with Cooke and Anderson, 2011), and Anthony Reid and the Study of the Southeast Asian Past (Co-ed with Geoff Wade, ISEAS, 2012).  Since 2010, Li Tana has developed interests in environmental history of Vietnam and has been a CI of two Australia Research Council Linkage Grants, on “Southeast Asia’s global economy, climate and the impact of natural hazards from the 10th to 21st centuries” (2010-2013), and “Hazards, Tipping Points, Adaptation and Collapse in the Indo-Pacific World” (2015-2019). Both projects are led by James Warren of Murdoch University.  In ISEAS, Dr Li will be working on a manuscript about the maritime history of Vietnam. She will also devote time in leading an international collaborative project, “The Making of the Red River”, which is financially supported by the Chiang Chingkuo Foundation, Taiwan. This study of the ecological history of the Greater Red River region is carried out by a team of historians, geologists, and GIS experts based in Austria, France, Vietnam, and Taiwan.

 

Antariksa

 

ANTARIKSA

Antariksa is co-founding member of KUNCI Cultural Studies Centre, Yogyakarta, Indonesia—a research collective focusing on critical knowledge production, research-action, and vernacular education. He is the author of Tuan Tanah Kawin Muda: Hubungan LEKRA- Seni Rupa 1950-1965 [Tuan Tanah Kawin Muda: The relation between art and the Institute of People’s Culture 1950-1965] (CAF/IVAA, 2005). His primary research concerns art and the mobility of ideas in Japanese-occupied Southeast Asia. His forthcoming book is 日本占領期のインドネシアにお けるアート集団主義 [Art collectivism in Japanese-occupied Indonesia] (Kyushu University Press, 2017). He is currently recipient of Global South Fellowship at Le Collège d’études mondiales, Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme, Paris, France.

 

Nicholas CHAN

 

Nicholas CHAN

Nicholas Chan, research officer at the Centre, received his Masters Degree in Asian Studies from the S.Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University. He manages NSC’s website and social media platforms and assists with the editing of NSC publications. Nicholas has extensive experience in conducting socio-political research on Malaysian politics, state, and society. He is interested in policing issues, government and politics in Southeast Asia, and political violence.

 

Anjana SHARMA

 

Anjana SHARMA 

Dr Anjana Sharma is Visiting Senior Fellow at NSC. She is an Associate Professor at the Department of English, University of Delhi, India. From 2011–2015 (July), she was Founding Dean (Academic Planning) at Nalanda University located in Rajgir, Bihar, India. She obtained her PhD from the Department of English, The Pennsylvania State University, USA in 1990. Her dissertation was subsequently published as Autobiography of Desire: English Jacobin Women Novelists of the 1790s (Macmillan, 2004). It contested the hegemony of British Romantic poetry and provided a counterculture account through archival work on pamphlets, periodicals, memoirs, and novels of the pro French revolutionary writers in England in the 1790s. She has since then taught and published widely in this area.

Her other areas of interest are Indian Writing in English with a special focus on gender and culture. Her recent work is on the representation of Mahatma Gandhi in the public sphere in 1947. The Nalanda experience, where she conceptualized and built the first two schools of Historical Studies and Ecology and Environment Studies, shaped her most recent research on inter-Asian heritage and its transregional dynamics anchored in travel, trade, literature, arts and aesthetics. She is also actively engaged in writing for popular newspapers and weeklies on the interface between literature, life, and the concerns that shape liberal arts and interdisciplinary studies in higher education.

 

Peter BORSCHBERG

 

Peter BORSCHBERG

Peter Borschberg is an Associate Fellow at NSC. He ordinarily serves a member of the History Department at the National University of Singapore and through his association with the Baltic Borderlands global history project (IRTG 1540) also as a Guest Professor in Modern History at the University of Greifswald. Peter has been working on Europe-Asian interaction between the 16th and 19th centuries with a focus on the Singapore and Melaka Straits. Among his most important publications are his two monographs, The Singapore and Melaka Straits (2010), Hugo Grotius, the Portuguese and Free Trade in the East Indies (2012) as well as the two annotated source translations The Memoirs and Memorials of Jacques de Coutre (2014) and Journal, Memorials and Letters of Admiral Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (2015). At NSC Peter is finishing up a book titled Admiral Matelieff’s Singapore and Johor, c.1606-1616 and editing a series of texts translated from the Portuguese that touch on Singapore and the Johor River towns between 1511 and c.1590.

 

Kenneth Randall HALL

 

Kenneth R. HALL

Kenneth R. Hall, Professor of History at Ball State University (Indiana, USA), is a Senior Research Fellow in the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore. He has published a series of monographs and journal articles that address early Southeast Asia and south Indian history, most recently A History of Early Southeast Asia: Maritime Trade and Societal Development, c. 100-1500 (2011); and Networks of Trade, Polity, and Societal Integration in Chola-Era South India, c. 875-1400 (2014); and edited and co-authored Secondary Cities and Urban Networking in the Indian Ocean Realm, c. 1400-1800 (2008); The Growth of Non-Western Cities: Primary and Secondary Urban Networking, c. 900-1900 (2011); New Perspectives in the History and Historiography of Southeast Asia (2011); and Structural Change and Societal Integration in Early South India (2001/2005). He is on the advisory board of The Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, and was a Fulbright Senior Scholar/Professor of comparative religion at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia (2003-2004) and Southeast Asian studies at the Royal University of Phnom Penh (2012).

 

ZHANG Xing (张幸)

 

ZHANG Xing (张幸)

Zhang Xing is a PhD candidate at Peking University, China, and Martin Luther University, Germany. Her research focuses on Bengali literature and culture as well as the Chinese community in Kolkata. She has studied in Bangladesh and has done extensive fieldwork in Kolkata, India. Her dissertation examines the issues of the preservation of identity and cultural assimilation of the Kolkata Chinese. She has co-edited a special issue of the journal Overseas Chinese History Studies (Huaqiao Huaren lishi yanjiu) devoted to the Chinese community in India and written several articles and conference papers on the Kolkata Chinese. At the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, she will be working on the Chinese community in India as well as on Rabindranath Tagore’s visit to China in 1924 and his impact on Chinese literature.

 

YUAN Quan (袁泉)

 

YUAN Quan (袁泉)

Yuan Quan obtained her PhD degree in Archaeology at Peking University, and works as a research fellow in the Centre for the Study of Chinese Archaeology, Beijing. Her research is organized around wide-ranging aspects of social religion and visual arts in medieval and late imperial China. At the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, she worked on the transformation of the Buddhist goddess Hāritī in East and Southeast Asia as well as the ceramic cargo from the Tang shipwreck excavated in Belitung, Indonesia.