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Past Events

Seminar: The Indonesia National Survey Project: Economy, Society and Politics

07 Sep 2017
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

A number of important changes that have been transforming Indonesia’s economy, society, and politics are shaping this country’s future trajectory of development and democratic consolidation. Against the backdrop of these key developments, the ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute commissioned a nation-wide survey to enhance our understanding of public perceptions of economic, social, and political issues in Indonesia. The survey collects public opinion data in a wide range of areas, fielding questions on macroeconomic performance, economic policy, the state, political participation, political parties, infrastructure, Islam, ethnicity, and international relations. Data were drawn from a nationally representative sample of 1,600 respondents in all 34 provinces in Indonesia to ensure countrywide representation of opinions and attitudes. Conducted in the wake of the Jakarta gubernatorial election, where certain religious and ethnic fault-lines were accentuated, the findings of this survey provide important and useful data for understanding the recent cleavages in Indonesian politics and society.

About the Speakers

Diego Fossati is a Research Fellow at the Griffith Asia Institute and an Associate Fellow at the ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. He studies voting behavior, democratization and development in low and middle-income countries, with an empirical concentration on Indonesia and Southeast Asia. He was trained as a political scientist at Cornell University, where he earned a PhD in January 2016 with a dissertation on the politics of health insurance for the poor in decentralized Indonesia. His research has been published or is forthcoming in leading peer-reviewed international journals such as World Development, European Journal of Political Research, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Journal of East Asian Studies and Contemporary Southeast Asia.

Hui Yew-Foong is Senior Fellow with the ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute and Associate Professor at Hong Kong Shue Yan University. His research interests include the Chinese overseas in Southeast Asia, religion and politics in Southeast Asia, decentralization in post-Suharto Indonesia, and heritage politics. Besides Singapore, he has conducted multi-sited field research in Indonesia, East Malaysia, China and Hong Kong. He is the author of Strangers at Home: History and Subjectivity among the Chinese Communities of West Kalimantan, Indonesia, co-author of Different Under God: A Survey of Church-Going Protestants in Singapore and co-editor of Citizens, Civil Society and Heritage-Making in Asia.

Siwage Dharma Negara is Fellow with the ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. He is currently an editorial member of Journal of Southeast Asian Economies. Before joining ISEAS, he was a researcher with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). His current research interests include development policy, regional connectivity, industrial and trade competitiveness with special focus on Indonesia. He received his PhD from the University of Melbourne, Australia.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 6 September 2017.

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Seminar: Blasphemy: The Interplay between Law, Politics, and Religion in Indonesia

06 Jun 2017
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

On 9 May 2017 – less than a year after his purportedly blasphemous speech – the former Jakarta Governor, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, was convicted of blasphemy and sentenced to two years imprisonment. The case and the verdict that followed polarized Indonesians: on one end of the spectrum, there are those who believe he should be freed of trumped-up charges of blasphemy; on the other end, are individuals and groups who thought that his sentence was inadequate.

In any case, the blasphemy saga surrounding Ahok – due to its high profile and politically-charged nature – has emerged as a test case not only for religious tolerance in Indonesia, but also for the rule of law and politicization of religion. It raises crucial questions: were the charge, prosecution, and conviction legally justified? To what extent do ethno-religious issues factor into the overall development and outcome of the case? What were the broader political circumstances at play?

This presentation will highlight the interaction between law and politics in the Blasphemy Law conviction involving the former Jakarta governor and in cases implicating issues of religion, more generally. It will argue that law (and law enforcement) cannot be separated from the games of power and broader politics of society. The governor’s conviction places the rule of law and democracy in Indonesia at a critical juncture, but more importantly, the context of the case indicates a strengthening susceptibility to the politicization of ethno-religious sentiments. The presentation will also draw on similar experiences from neighbouring countries in Asia.

About the Speaker

Dian A. H. Shah is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Asian Legal Studies, National University of Singapore (NUS). She graduated with an LL.B from the University of Warwick and earned her doctorate and masters degrees from Duke University. Her research interests span the fields of constitutional history, comparative constitutional law, and human rights, focusing on issues arising from the interaction between law, religion, and politics in Asia. She has spent a considerable amount of time researching in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Sri Lanka. Dian has previously published her works in several international journals and collaborative academic publications and is also a frequent guest lecturer at selected universities in Indonesia. She recently completed her first monograph entitled "Constitutions, Religion, and Politics in Asia: Indonesia, Malaysia and Sri Lanka" (CUP, forthcoming November 2017) and is the Co-Editor (with Andrew Harding) of a book on “Law and Society in Malaysia: Pluralism, Ethnicity, and Religion” (Routledge, forthcoming 2017).  Dian also serves as the Deputy Editor of the Asian Journal of Comparative Law.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 5 June 2017.

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Seminar: Jakarta Gubernatorial Election of 2017: Identity, Personality, and Incumbency Factors

22 May 2017
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

This presentation will discuss several main variables/factors which affected voting behaviour in Jakarta's gubernatorial election of 2017. The focus will be, among others, on three main variables: the role of identity politics, the importance of personality and psychological factors, and the challenged incumbency effect. The analysis will be based on SMRC's surveys' data and exit polls of the first and second round of the election. Reflection on implication will also include the short and middle term impact of this local election in Indonesian politics, particularly on 2018 simultaneous local elections and 2019 national elections

About the Speaker

Djayadi Hanan is a Lecturer of Political Science at Paramadina University in Jakarta where he also serves as Director of The University’s Institute for Education Reform (IER). Besides that, Djayadi is an Executive Director of Saiful Mujani Research and Consulting (SMRC), a leading political research and polling institute in the country. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Ohio State University as well as Master degrees both from Ohio University and Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Djayadi has served as Director of Research and Services at Paramadina University Jakarta, Senior Researcher with the The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) – Indonesia, and researcher at the Ohio State University and the Ministry of Regional Autonomy of the Republic of Indonesia. In 2012, he resided in Harvard Kennedy School as a research fellow where he conducted research on multiparty presidential democracy in developing countries. His main fields of expertise include the role of education in democratic cultures, legislative and executive interaction at the local, regional and national level, and student and religious movements during democratization processes. As a political scientist, Djayadi publishes articles in several journals and writes extensively in Indonesian major newspapers. As a political commentator he has been interviewed by major national televisions, radios, and printed media in Indonesia and overseas. His latest book (Mizan, 2014) is entitled: “Menakar Presidensialisme Multipartai di Indonesia” (Understanding Multiparty Presidentialism in Indonesia).

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 19 May 2017.

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Seminar: The Jakarta Pilkada and the "Class Discontent Versus Sectarianism" Controversy

15 May 2017
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

In the recent Jakarta Gubernatorial elections the Incumbent, Basuki Tjahaya Purnama was defeated by Anies Baswedan, approximately 58% to 42%. Following the publication of an article by Dr Ian Wilson of Murdoch University, entitled: "Jakarta: Inequality and the poverty of elite pluralism" in the Australian National University's NEW MANDALA website publication, a sharp and ongoing debate has developed over the respective roles of class versus religion in the recent elections. Both Indonesian and non-Indonesian political analysts and actors have weighed in on this debate. Was religious sectarianism, fanning intolerance, the key factor or was class alienation from Governor Basuki Tjahaya Purnama a factor too frequently ignored by commentators and political actors? As this debate has unfolded, there are some who have also warned that the fate suffered by Governor Purnama may also be suffered by President Widodo. This is argued, for example, in Mietzner and Muhtadi's "Ahok’s satisfied non-voters: an anatomy" also in New Mandala, a publication that campaigned strongly for President Widodo in 2014. Was this an election pitting the rights of minorities against intolerance and sectarianism or something more complicated? Was it a rejection of choosing officials on the basis of their achievements or otherwise in favour of voting based on religious identity? This presentation will review the debate that has unfolded, looking at a variety of commentaries. It will argue that the campaign and the vote can best be explained by a series of intersecting tensions both within and between social classes in Jakarta (and Indonesia) and a strengthening of the trend towards scapegoat politics in a situation of gross imbalance in ideological activity among various political actors. The presentation will make some assessments of possible future trends in national politics.

About the Speaker

Max Lane is a Senior Visiting Fellow at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute and a Visiting Lecturer at the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Gajah Mada University. His most recent books are Decentralization and Discontents: An Essay on Class, Political Agency and National Perspective in Indonesian Politics (ISEAS 2014); Unfinished Nation: Indonesia Before and After Suharto (Verso 2008, 2017); and Catastrophe in Indonesia (Seagull/University of Chicago 2010). In 2016 he published a collection of poems and prose in Indonesia and Not, Poems and Otherwise: Anecdotes Scattered (Djaman Baroe, 2016), which was launched at the 2016 Singapore Writers Festival. He is also the translator of Pramoedya Ananta Toer's Buru Quartet set of novels and other works of Toer as well as plays and poems of W.S. Rendra. He was the founding editor of Inside Indonesia magazine, has served as a Second Secretary at the Australian Embassy in Jakarta and as a Principal Research Officer for the Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade in the Australian Parliament as well as a journalist.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 12 May 2017.

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Seminar: “Elektabilitas” Politics and the 2017 Local Elections: quo vadis Indonesia's Party System?

24 Mar 2017
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

This presentation will review the recent elections for governors, district heads and mayors, looking in particular at the relationship between parties and their most prominent candidates, usually chosen for "electability" above all else. The recent gubernatorial election in Jakarta will be a major focus of the presentation, along with references to other areas. What are the implications for the role of ideology and policy, especially in terms of national political economy, with the steadily increasing strength of "elektabilitas" politics? The presentation will argue that the increasing trend for parties to coalesce specifically around “electable candidates” rather than ideological, programmatic or platform perspectives represents a stagnation in Indonesian party politics. This stagnation represents a deep capturing of these parties by a narrowly defined status quo political economy. It will also argue that on the rare occasions where policy issues or ideology have been important in the recent local elections for bupati, mayors and governors, the policies have been the policies of individuals and not parties and have a strictly local characteristic thereby not effectively countering the status quo capture of the party system.

The gubernatorial elections in Jakarta will be highlighted as a partial exception, resulting from the perception that the elections there are directly connected to the 2019 Presidential elections, which has national implications. However, policy differences of substance still did not become central. Different ideological emphasis around the issue of the role of religion and ‘pluralism’ did emerge but were not reflected in any policy debates.

About the Speaker

Max Lane is a Senior Visiting Fellow (half-time) at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute and a Visiting Lecturer at the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Gajah Mada University. His most recent books are Decentralization and Discontents: An Essay on Class, Political Agency and National Perspective in Indonesian Politics (ISEAS 2014); Unfinished Nation: Indonesia Before and After Suharto (Verso 2008, 2017); and Catastrophe in Indonesia (Seagull/University of Chicago 2010). In 2016 he published a collection of poems and prose in Indonesia, Poems and Otherwise: Anecdotes Scattered (Djaman Baroe, 2016), which was launched at the 2016 Singapore Writers Festival. He is also the translator of Pramoedya Ananta Toer's Buru Quartet set of novels and other works of Toer as well as plays and poems of W.S. Rendra. He was the founding editor of Inside Indonesia magazine, has served as a Second Secretary at the Australian Embassy in Jakarta and as a Principal Research Officer for the Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade in the Australian Parliament as well as a journalist.

Registration

To register, please fill in this form and email it to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 23 March 2017.

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Seminar: The 2017 Indonesian Regional Elections: A Preamble to the 2019 Presidential Election?

17 Feb 2017

About the Seminar

The 2017 round of simultaneous direct local elections (Pilkada) taking place on 15 February in Indonesia bears great significance for national politics. At stake is not only the Jakarta governorship, but also the presidency in 2019, as President Joko Widodo has shown that whoever wins the Jakarta election may have a shot at the presidency. The evolving saga of the gubernatorial race in Jakarta, which has seen the incumbent Chinese Christian governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama accused of blasphemy against Islam and embroiled in an on-going court case, demonstrates that religious and ethnic sensitivities cannot be ignored in Indonesian politics. At the same time, elections in Jakarta and other regions continue to reveal the importance of factors such as the role of political parties, the electability of candidates and money politics in Indonesian national politics.

This seminar aims to outline the nuances of these trends in the 2017 simultaneous Pilkada, drawing not only on the Jakarta case but also cases in East Java and West Kalimantan. Through such a comparative perspective, we will consider the issues that will remain prominent in national politics as the 2019 presidential and general elections approach.

 

About the Speakers

Hui Yew-Foong is an anthropologist and Senior Fellow with ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. His research interests include the Chinese minority in Indonesia, religion and politics in Southeast Asia, decentralization in post-Suharto Indonesia, and heritage politics. He had been a Visiting Fellow at Cornell University, the University of Hong Kong and Xiamen University. Besides Singapore, he has conducted multi-sited field research in Indonesia, East Malaysia, South China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. He is the author of Strangers at Home: History and Subjectivity among the Chinese Communities of West Kalimantan, Indonesia, co-author of Different Under God: A Survey of Church-Going Protestants in Singapore and editor of Encountering Islam: The Politics of Religious Identities in Southeast Asia.

Ulla Fionna is Fellow at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute.  She studied at Airlangga University, the University of Warwick, and the University of Sydney. After receiving her PhD, she held post-doctoral positions and taught at the University of Sydney. She is the author of The Institutionalisation of Political Parties in Post-authoritarian Indonesia: From the Grass-roots Up (Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press, 2013), and editor of Watching the Indonesian Elections 2014 (Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2015). Her latest article “The trap of pop-charisma for the institutionalization of Indonesia's post-Suharto parties” was published in the Asian Journal of Political Science (2016). Her main research interests are Indonesian politics, political parties, electoral politics, and democratisation. Currently, she is observing the Indonesian middle-class Muslims and their political aspirations.

Charlotte Setijadi is Visiting Fellow at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. Her research interests include Chinese soft power in Southeast Asia, ethnic Chinese business networks, transnational migration, and identity politics in Indonesia. Charlotte completed her Ph.D. in Anthropology at La Trobe University, Melbourne. Prior to joining ISEAS, Charlotte was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University. Her most recent journal article ‘”A Beautiful Bridge: Chinese Indonesian Associations, Social Capital and Strategic Identification in a New Era of China-Indonesia Relations’ was published by the Journal of Contemporary China (2016). 

Johanes Herlijanto is a Visiting Fellow at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore. He earned his PhD in anthropology at Macquarie University, Sydney and Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. Johanes previously taught in the Department of International Relations, Bina Nusantara University, Jakarta, and in the Chinese studies program at the University of Indonesia, Depok. His publications include, “‘Search for Knowledge as Far as China!’ Indonesian Responses to the Rise of China”, in Chinese Encounters in Southeast Asia, How People, Money, and Ideas from China Are Changing A Region, Pal Nyiri and Danielle Tan (eds.) (Seattle: University of Washington Press Forthcoming). He also wrote an ISEAS Perspective “What Does Indonesia’s Pribumi Elite Think of Ethnic Chinese Today?”, and “Cultivating the Past, Imagining the Future: Enthusiasm for Zheng He in Contemporary Indonesia” in Zheng He and the Afro-Asian World, Chia Lin Sien & Sally K Church (eds.) (Singapore:  Melaka Museums Corporation [PERZIM] and International Zheng He Society, 2012). He is currently working on the perception of China and the ethnic Chinese in Indonesia, especially among the pribumi Indonesian political and economic elite


Registration

To register, please fill in this form and email it to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 16 February 2017.

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Seminar: The Current Controversy around the “1965 Tragedy”: On the Cusp of a New Phase of Democratisation?

21 Nov 2016
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

In April this year, the then Coordinating Minister for Politics and Security, Luhut Panjaitan, together with the Governor of the National Defence Institute (LEMHAMNAS), retired major-General Agus Wijoyo, organised a national symposium on the “1965 tragedy”. This followed several years of persistent advocacy by human rights and victims groups. It also followed promises of resolving” the “1965 tragedy”– though vague – made by Joko Widodo during his presidential campaign in 2014. The symposium went for two days and heard presentations from a range of parties, including former political prisoners and historians. The symposium is yet to make public its recommendations to the President.

In the wake of the symposium another symposium was organised by retired generals, with the presence of the Minister for Defence, Ryamizard Ryacudu. This symposium took a position hostile to any “reconciliation” process that conceded wrong doing by the Indonesian state or military. It advocated the launching of a movement to squash what it saw as a revival of Indonesian Communist Party (PKI). At the same time, there was an escalation of actions by anti-communist groups, including some using the Islamic banner, to physically disrupt events around the country considered to be sympathetic to the PKI. This activity championed by former generals, Kivlan Zein and Kiki Syahnakri, has in turn elicited resistance and counter-polemics. Government spokesperson’s statements appear to be seeking a middle course.

This presentation will report on these events but also present an analysis that the emergence of a public national discussion on this issue challenges the limits imposed by post New Order “reformasi” democracy, and asks whether those limits are likely to collapse or be extended.

About the Speaker

Dr Max Lane is a Senior Visiting Fellow at ISEAS and has been an irregular guest lecturer at Gajah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia and Yogyakarta State University. He is author of Unfinished Nation: Indonesia before and After Suharto (Verso, 2008), Catastrophe in Indonesia (Seagull, 2010) and Decentralization and Its Discontents: An Essay on Class, Political Agency and National Perspective in Indonesian Politics (ISEAS, 2014).   He is also translator of Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s This Earth of Mankind and its sequels, Arok of Java and The Chinese in Indonesia, as well as of W.S. Rendra’s Struggle of the Naga Tribe. He has observed Indonesia as an officer of the Australian Embassy, a researcher at the Australian Parliament, a journalist as well as an academic.

He is currently writing a monograph length introduction to the politics of the Indonesian labour movement. His next publication will be Indonesia and Not: Poems and Otherwise (Djaman Baroe, Yogyakarta, forthcoming, 2016.)

Registration

To register, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 18 November 2016.

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Conference: Beyond the National: The Regional and Transnational Trajectories of Chinese Indonesians

20 Oct 2016

About the Conference

The fall of the New Order regime in 1998 and the abolition of assimilation policies in the post-Suharto ushered in a “revival” of Chinese culture and identity politics in Indonesia. In particular, the post-Suharto years, with the rise of regional autonomy and identities, have also seen a more pronounced regional identity politics among ethnic Chinese keen to express their diverse regional origins. Externally, the rapid rise of China in the last fifteen years has become a significant factor that influenced Chinese Indonesian identity politics. For many Chinese Indonesians, the rise of China incited a feeling of pride towards one’s Chineseness, particularly after decades of forced assimilation. Furthermore, the burgeoning bilateral relationship between the PRC and Indonesia has seen Chinese Indonesian organisations and individuals playing a greater role in dealings between the two countries.

In the context of these new developments, new questions need to be asked with regards to the position and perceptions of contemporary post-Suharto Chinese Indonesians. For instance, how are Chinese Indonesians from different parts of Indonesia shaped by their regional contexts, and how does this affect their roles in local politics and economies? What roles do Chinese Indonesians play in contemporary Sino-Indonesian relations? How do Chinese Indonesians perceive Chinese identity and belonging at the time of China’s rise? At the other end of the spectrum, it also needs to be asked: how do non-Chinese Indonesians perceive the greater visibility of Chineseness in post-Suharto Indonesia? Furthermore, in an era of heightened connectivity, what sort of trans-national/trans-border/trans-local connections do Chinese Indonesians forge and maintain?

Today, the time is right for scholars to reassess the Chinese Indonesian situation and to potentially move beyond the conventional framework of the nation-state. This conference is intended to be a scholarly “update” on the contemporary history and ethnography of Chinese Indonesians. It is also intended to be a forum where both established and emerging scholars can introduce new directions and trends in Chinese Indonesian studies, particularly those with a transnational approach.

Keynote speaker:  Dr Mary Somers Heidhues

Conference programme: Click here for the programme

Registration: Attendance to the conference is free of charge but registration is required by 14 October 2016.  As seats are limited, please register early using this registration form. Admission to the conference can only be taken as confirmed upon receiving the written acceptance from ISEAS. For any queries, please feel free to e-mail: <iseasevents2@iseas.edu.sg>.

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Seminar: Previewing the 2017 Jakarta Election: Candidates, Coalitions and Prospects for the Campaign

27 Sep 2016
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

In February 2017, Indonesia will stage yet another round of direct local elections for governors, mayors and district heads. Arguably, the most highly anticipated of these upcoming polls will be the gubernatorial election in the capital Jakarta where incumbent governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, better known as Ahok, will seek to become the first Christian ethnic Chinese to win an executive election in the nation’s capital. In recent months, the Jakarta election has already captured the public’s attention as Ahok reneged on an earlier announcement to run as an independent candidate and accepted a party nomination instead. Meanwhile, speculation and rumours about who will challenge Ahok in the election have also mounted ahead of the registration deadline on 23 September. Given the pivotal importance of this election and the immense public interest in who will become Jakarta’s next governor, this seminar will provide a preview of the 2017 Jakarta election. It will introduce the candidates who registered with the General Election Commission, trace their pathways to the nomination, and assess their respective strengths and weaknesses. It will then contextualize the election in broader political trends in Indonesia and analyse the significance of the impending campaign for future elections in Indonesia. 

About the Speakers

Dr Charlotte Setijadi is Visiting Fellow at the ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. Her research interests include Chinese soft power in Southeast Asia, ethnic Chinese business networks, transnational migration, and identity politics in Indonesia.

Dr Deasy Simandjuntak is Visiting Fellow at the ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. Her research interests include democratization, decentralization, local elections and identity politics in Indonesia.

Dr Dirk Tomsa is a Senior Visiting Fellow at the ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute. His main research interests include electoral and party politics in Indonesia as well as comparative Southeast Asian politics.

Registration
To register, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 26 September 2016.
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Seminar: Dragon or Panda: The Indonesian Elites’ Perception of China and Sino-Indonesia Relations

27 Jul 2016
INDONESIA STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

Since the beginning of this century, the relations between Indonesia and China have become much closer. Trades between the two countries have significantly increased, especially after the strategic partnership agreement between the two countries was signed in 2005. In recent years, the incoming investments from China have also grown unprecedentedly, especially in the mining and infrastructure sectors. Cultural and political relations between these two Asian countries have also improved, as exemplified by the establishment of several Confucius Institutes in Indonesia, and the mutual visits between a number of Indonesian political parties and the Chinese Communist Party.

Yet critical voices about China and its relation with Indonesia are apparent in certain groups of Indonesians, who may be broadly defined as the elites. Suspicions about China’s agenda to dominate Indonesia through its participation in Indonesia’s infrastructure projects, and in collaboration with the ethnic Chinese big businessmen and politicians, are spread widely, especially among those who resent the Indonesian government’s close relations with China. What are the basis for these suspicions? Who are the groups of elites who believe in these views? How do the elite members of the groups who support President Joko Widodo see China and the latest development of its relations with Indonesia? This presentation will attempt to discuss these questions.

About the Speaker

Johanes Herlijanto is a Visiting Fellow at ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore. He earned his PhD in anthropology at Macquarie University, Sydney and Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. 
 
Johanes previously taught in the Department of International Relations, Bina Nusantara University, Jakarta, and in the Chinese studies program at the University of Indonesia, Depok. 
 
His publications include, “‘Search for Knowledge as Far as China!’ Indonesian Responses to the Rise of China”, in Chinese Encounters in Southeast Asia, How People, Money, and Ideas from China Are Changing A Region, Pal Nyiri and Danielle Tan (eds.) (Seattle: University of Washington Press, Forthcoming). He also wrote an ISEAS Perspective on “What Does Indonesia’s Pribumi Elite Think of Ethnic Chinese Today?”, and “Cultivating the Past, Imagining the Future: Enthusiasm for Zheng He in Contemporary Indonesia” in Zheng He and the Afro-Asian World, Chia Lin Sien & Sally K Church (eds.) (Singapore: Melaka Museums Corporation [PERZIM] and International Zheng He Society, 2012). He is currently working on the perception of China and the ethnic Chinese in Indonesia, especially among the pribumi Indonesian political and economic elite.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg by 26 July 2016.

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