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Past Events

Indonesia and ASEAN's Changing Dynamics

04 Oct 2017
ASEAN LECTURE SERIES

About the Lecture 

At its mid-century mark, ASEAN finds itself in need of a dose of fresh ideas to rejuvenate the regional project and its economic rationale for regional stability. ASEAN’s trajectory inevitably finds an overlap with that of one of its founding members and a key proponent of regional responses to global challenges: Indonesia. Indonesia is – and has always been – a key node in ASEAN’s axis. But Indonesia’s commitment to, and efforts for, its ASEAN priorities has not lingered in discussions within or outside the country in recent years. This ASEAN Lecture will hear a perspective on some of Indonesia's core rationale for its ASEAN engagement and on how Indonesia has responded to, and promoted changes in ASEAN, and worked within ASEAN to respond to regional and global changes.

About the Speaker

Dr Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa, former Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, is currently an Asia Society Policy Institute Distinguished Fellow. Dr Natalegawa’s distinguished career in foreign affairs spans various appointments at home and abroad since 1986, including Director-General for ASEAN Cooperation, Chief of Staff of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Spokesperson of the Department of Foreign Affairs, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Indonesia to the United Nations in New York, and Ambassador of the Republic of Indonesia to the Court of St. James and to Ireland. Dr Natalegawa earned his Doctor of Philosophy from The Australian National University, a Master of Philosophy from Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge, and a Bachelor of Science (Hons) from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Foreign Policy has included Dr Natalegawa among its 2013 list of 500 most influential individuals.

Registration
To register, please complete the attached registration form and e-mail ascevents@iseas.edu.sg.
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Seminar: The United States and Southeast Asia Under the Trump Administration

26 Sep 2017

ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE SEMINAR

About the Seminar

President Trump is expected to make his first visit to Asia in November 2017 for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting, East Asia Summit (EAS) and bilateral meetings with leaders of regional countries. This seminar offers one American perspective prior to the visit on the continuities and divergences between the Obama and Trump Administrations regarding Southeast Asia, developments in U.S.-Southeast Asia relations during the first nine months of the Trump Administration and the prospects for U.S. bilateral and multilateral ties with Southeast Asia. It argues that there are clear differences (and uncertainties) regarding the Trump Administration versus the Obama Administration’s approaches to Southeast Asia. However, the weight and diversity of American interests in Southeast Asia remains a constant, and the Trump Administration has pursued active ties with regional countries. Key unknowns that remain include the relative balance between key drivers of U.S.-Southeast Asia ties as well as between diplomacy/defense and trade/investment elements of ties.

Dr. Limaye will also discuss the findings from the latest edition of ASEAN Matters for America/America Matters for ASEAN, a cooperative effort of the East West Center, ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute and the US-ASEAN Business Council.

About the Speaker

Dr. Satu Limaye is Director, East West Center in Washington, Senior Advisor, CNA Corporation, and Creator & Director of AsiaMattersforAmerica.org. His recent U.S.-Southeast Asia publications include: Why ASEAN is Here to Stay and What That Means for the U.S. (2016), Signs are Taken for Wonders: The Trump Administration and Southeast Asia (2017), From ‘Peak’ to ‘Plateau’ in U.S.-ASEAN Relations (forthcoming), ASEAN is Neither the Problem Nor Solution to South China Sea Disputes (forthcoming). Dr. Limaye covers a range of U.S.-Asia Pacific international relations issues. He is a graduate of Georgetown and Oxford Universities where he was a George C. Marshall Scholar.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 25 September 2017.

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Conference on The Paris Climate Agreement: Issues and Implications for ASEAN

28 Jul 2017
ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE 

CONFERENCE ON
THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT:  ISSUES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ASEAN


About the Conference

On 1 June 2017, US President Donald Trump announced that the “United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord” and that his administration would seek new negotiations that are “fair” to the US. Mr Trump’s predecessor, Mr Barack Obama, had committed to the landmark Paris Agreement together with China’s President Xi Jinping in September 2016, boosting the threshold for the Paris Agreement to enter into force, which it did on 4 November 2016. It is timely to assess the implications of the US withdrawal, although its full weight and force be manifested a few years down the road. Some analyse that US withdrawal may dampen developing countries’ efforts in combating climate change, while others posit that the US might have done more damage inside the Paris Agreement than outside it.

ISEAS is convening a conference to discuss the changes and challenges for ASEAN countries in light of the Paris commitments and the US move. The ten ASEAN member states are signatories to the Paris Agreement, and nine have ratified it. The conference sessions will discuss:

(a) The impact of climate change in the region
(b) Economic costs and opportunities
(c) Impact of US’ withdrawal from the Paris Agreement on ASEAN countries
(d) Country perspectives: Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines


Programme

The Conference programme is attached here for your information.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 26 July 2017.

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Symposium: Updates on the ASEAN Economic Community

27 Jul 2017

ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE SYMPOSIUM:
UPDATES ON THE ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY

About the Symposium

There was considerable public discussion and dialogue on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) in the few years preceding the launch of the AEC in 2015. In contrast, there has been very little public information on the progress made in economic integration in ASEAN since then, even though the AEC is very much a community in the making. At the same time, global uncertainties have heightened with an increasing possibility of a retreat from regional trade agreements towards bilateral arrangements while multilateral liberalization remains at a standstill. ASEAN’s external environment is filled with unfolding events such as Trump’s policies, the Brexit and China’s on-going restructuring efforts that may impact both global and regional growth. Integration efforts have to deepen in order for the region to tap on it’s potential to grow and to withstand exogenous shocks that may emerge due to increasing uncertainties. In the light of all these developments, ASEAN Studies Centre at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute is organizing a one-day symposium entitled ‘Updates on the ASEAN Economic Community’. The event will bring together government representatives, academia, as well as the private sector to share perspectives, knowledge, and experience in regional economic cooperation and integration within the context of the AEC.

Programme

The Symposium programme is attached here for your information.


Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 25 July 2017.

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Seminar: China’s “New Assertiveness” and the Decline in East Asian Regionalism: Implications for ASEAN

13 Jun 2017
REGIONAL STRATEGIC & POLITICAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
AND ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE

About the Seminar

The Asian financial crisis in 1997-1998 awakened a decade of vibrant scholarly and political debate touting East Asian regionalism as “inevitable and necessary”. Today, however, the prospect of regionalism seems to have lost its luster in favour of a darker regional narrative. Has the heyday of East Asian regionalism and ASEAN’s vision of an emerging Asian community now come to pass? This presentation explores the declining policy and scholarly narrative of Asian regionalism since 2011 within the broader context of Asian security trends. Until recently, discussion of East Asia’s future vacillated between two different narratives: one marked by robust economic growth, increased interdependence, and the growth of Asian regionalism, and the other characterized by increased tensions, rising military budgets, and slower economic growth with conflict looming on the horizon. Since 2011, however, the discourse has shifted in favour of the latter narrative, casting a pall over the future of Asian regionalism. In particular, perceptions of China’s increasing assertiveness have resulted in a turn to more pragmatic interpretations of Asian regionalism defined by power balancing and institutional complexity. Thus, if ASEAN remains the driver of East Asian regionalism, China holds the key to further integration.

About the Speaker

Andrew I. Yeo is Associate Professor of Politics and Director of Asian Studies at The Catholic University of America. He is the author of Activists, Alliances, and Anti-U.S. Base Protests (Cambridge University Press, 2011). Dr Yeo is currently completing two book projects: the first explores the evolution of East Asia’s institutional architecture from 1945 to the present. The second is a co-edited volume titled Living in an Age of Mistrust (forthcoming with Routledge Press). His other research has appeared in International Studies Quarterly, European Journal of International Relations, Perspectives on Politics, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, Comparative Politics, and Journal of East Asian Studies among others. He is the principal investigator of a two-year Korea Foundation sponsored project on North Korean human rights discourse and transnational advocacy. Dr Yeo is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies, and was a Mansfield Foundation U.S.-Korea Scholar-Policymaker Nexus Fellow in 2013-2014. He received his Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University in 2008 and a BA magna cum laude in Psychology and International Studies from Northwestern University.

Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to iseasevents2@iseas.edu.sg by 12 June 2017.

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Seminar: De-Globalisation Sentiments and Risks for ASEAN Economies

28 Apr 2017

ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC STUDIES PROGRAMME

About the Seminar

The risk of de-globalisation is on the rise due to a combination of economic and political risks. Global trade has slowed down since the 2008-09 crisis as a result of the slowing down of trade liberalization and rising protectionism. New barriers in form of bailouts, trade defence measures, import tariff increases and localisation requirements have increased sharply. The US, India, Indonesia are some of the more prominent examples of countries turning to trade barriers to protect their national economies. It is unsurprising that the politicization of trade has come to the forefront in advanced economies as voters make their frustrations known through the ballot boxes, expressing their angst against stagnant wages and rising income inequality, which were attributed to unfair foreign competition. All this is unlikely to bode well for ASEAN economies. While the region has limited direct exposure to the US, its indirect linkage through China is a matter of concern. The region is cautious about a future economic downturn or a similar political backlash in their own economies.

The Seminar will discuss the implication of global developments on ASEAN economies from research, policy-making and private sector perspectives.

Programme

8:30 – 9:00 Registration
9:00 – 10:00 Session I: Understanding De-globalisation and Its Impact on ASEAN Economies
  Mr Marcus Bartley Johns, Senior Trade Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice World Bank, Singapore
  Dr Deborah Elms,  Founder and Executive Director, Asian Trade Centre, Singapore
10:00 – 10:30 Q&A
10:30 – 10:45 Coffee
10:45 – 11:45 Session II: De-globalisation Sentiments: Views from the Public and Private Sectors
  Ms Mary Elizabeth Chelliah, Principle Trade Specialist, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Singapore
  Ms Priyanka Kishore, Lead Asia Economist, Oxford Economics, Singapore
11:45 – 12:15 Q&A

Click here for more details about the programme and speakers.


Registration

For registration, please fill in this form and email to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 27 April 2017.
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ASEAN Lecture Series: The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP): Progress, Challenges and Outlook

22 Mar 2017

ASEAN LECTURE SERIES

About the Lecture 

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) has gained significant attention as a pathway for pan-Asian economic integration, especially in light of the uncertainties facing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). RCEP was initiated by ASEAN in late 2011 to bring together ASEAN member states and six of their Dialogue Partners – Australia, China, India, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea – in a collaborative framework towards a comprehensive and mutually beneficial economic partnership agreement that is both WTO-consistent and transparent. RCEP also aspires to improve on the existing ASEAN+1 Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) while covering regular trade issues of goods, services, investment, intellectual property, competition policy, technical cooperation and dispute settlement mechanisms. The guiding principles of RCEP, as endorsed in 2012, take into consideration the different levels of development among the members, which raises concerns over the quality of the agreement when completed. Although negotiations were launched in May 2013, little of the discussions has found its way into the public domain. This lecture will discuss the progress and challenges in RCEP negotiations thus far, as well as providing some insights on the depth and expanse of the agreement and the anticipated date of concluding the negotiations.                                                                                                      

About the Speaker

Mr. Iman Pambagyo is Director-General for International Trade Negotiations at the Ministry of Trade, Republic of Indonesia. He has been Chairman of the Trade Negotiating Committee of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) since 2012 and Chief Negotiator for the Indonesia-EU Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement since 2016. Prior to his appointment as Director-General, Mr Pambagyo was Special Staff to Minister on Priority Global Trade Policy, and served as Indonesian Ambassador to WTO from 2014 to 2015. Having worked on trade diplomacy and negotiations area, Mr Pambagyo was the ASEAN Senior Economic Officials Meeting (SEOM) Leader for Indonesia from 2007 to 2014 and Indonesia’s Chief Negotiator and Trade Representative at various bilateral and multilateral negotiations. Mr Pambagyo studied International Relations at University of Gadjah Mada, Jogjakarta and earned his Masters degree in International Politics from McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.

Registration
To register, please complete the attached registration form and e-mail it to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 21 March 2017.

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Lecture: ASEAN at 50: Reflections on Its Past, Present and Future

01 Feb 2017

ASEAN LECTURE SERIES


About the Lecture

As ASEAN marks its 50th year, this lecture will review its achievements, challenges and prospects. During the last fifty years, ASEAN has gained a regional and global prominence that its founders would not have anticipated. But ASEAN is also in the danger of being a victim of its past success. A combination of regional and external circumstances in the 1990s tempted ASEAN to take on tasks and roles that it was not created or suited to undertake. ASEAN’s membership, purpose and role have expanded considerably. But the regional environment today is considerably different, especially with the emergence of a more powerful, assertive China and the geopolitical uncertainties caused by the US Presidential election. While ASEAN has undertaken an ambitious program of community-building, its institutions and resources, both material and normative, remain inadequate to meet its new obligations and burdens. The lecture will conclude by offering some suggestions as to how ASEAN can move forward in an increasingly complex global and regional environment.

 

About the Speaker

Amitav Acharya is the Boeing Company Chair in International Relations at the Schwarzman Scholars Program, Tsinghua University, Beijing, and Distinguished Professor of International Relations and the UNESCO Chair in Transnational Challenges and Governance at the School of International Service, American University, Washington, DC. Among his major works on Southeast Asia are The Quest for Identity: International Relations of Southeast Asia (Oxford 2000); Constructing a Security Community in Southeast Asia: ASEAN and the Problems of Regional Order, 3rd edition (Routledge 2014), Whose Ideas Matter: Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism (Cornell and ISEAS, 2009); The Making of Southeast Asia (Cornell and ISEAS, 2013); and East of India, South of China: Sino-Indian Encounters in Southeast Asia (Oxford 2017). He was elected to the Christensen Fellowship at Oxford University and held the Nelson Mandela Visiting Professorship in International Relations at Rhodes University, South Africa. He is the first non-Western scholar to be elected as the President of the International Studies Association, the most respected and influential global network of scholars in International Relations. Acharya started his academic career as a Fellow of ISEAS (1987-89).

Registration
For registration, please fill in this form and email it to ascevents@iseas.edu.sg by 31 January 2017.

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ASEAN Lecture Series: The Philippines’ Priorities for the 2017 ASEAN Chairmanship

23 Nov 2016

ASEAN LECTURE SERIES

About the Lecture 

The Philippines will officially assume the ASEAN Chairmanship on 1 January 2017. In that year, ASEAN will also celebrate its 50th anniversary – a milestone event reflecting its successes and achievements in the past five decades as well as to prepare itself for the new challenges ahead in the region. While the Philippines is fully committed to realizing a rules-based, people-oriented, people-centered ASEAN community, it intends to introduce important initiatives that will significantly advance ASEAN community-building, promote inclusive and innovation-led growth; highlight ASEAN’s resilience; advance maritime security and cooperation; contribute to regional peace, security and stability; and showcase ASEAN as a model of regionalism and a global player.                                                                                                               

About the Speaker

His Excellency Enrique A. Manalo is Undersecretary for Policy at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Republic of the Philippines. In this capacity, he will be the Philippines’ ASEAN SOM Leader as the country chairs ASEAN in 2017. Mr. Manalo is a distinguished career diplomat, having served in the Philippines’ missions in Geneva, New York, Brussels, and London. Prior to his appointment as Undersecretary, Mr. Manalo was the ambassador to the United Kingdom from 2011 to 2016. He was the Philippines’ Sherpa for the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, and co-led negotiations with the EU for the Philippines-EU Partnership Cooperation Agreement. This will be the second time Mr. Manalo serves as the Philippines’ ASEAN SOM Leader, having previously done so the last time the Philippines chaired ASEAN in 2007. Mr. Manalo earned his BA and MA degrees in Economics from the University of the Philippines.

Registration
To register, please complete the attached registration form and e-mail ascevents@iseas.edu.sg. 


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Conference: Services Liberalization in ASEAN: Foreign Direct Investment in Logistics Sector

15 Nov 2016
ASEAN STUDIES CENTRE

About the Conference
The services sector has gained growing attention in recent years. It has accounted for an increasing share in the Gross Domestic Product of a number of economies while its global trade growth has surpassed the growth in merchandise trade. Further, the ten Southeast Asian countries aspire to deepen their services sector integration for building a stronger ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. However, services liberalization has progressed much more slowly than goods liberalization. Diverse regulations across countries have been identified as one of the key barriers to liberalization efforts. Within the services sector, efficient logistics is a pre-requisite for a smooth movement of goods within and across countries. It is also an important component for enhanced connectivity in ASEAN. But, the goal of integrating logistics in ASEAN has yet to be achieved. Despite the initiatives made to liberalize and integrate this sector, there are still many challenges ahead for improving logistics integration in order to reduce trade costs in ASEAN.
 
This Conference brings together prominent economists and logistics experts to assess the extent to which ASEAN’s services liberalization policies are able to attract Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the logistics sector. It further examines the challenges encountered in each of the 10 ASEAN member countries in this issue, with the aim of finding solutions for meeting the goals of logistics integration.
 
Attendance to the Conference is free of charge but registration is required by 11 November 2016.  As seats are limited, please register early.  Admission to the Conference can only be taken as confirmed upon receiving the written acceptance from ISEAS.

Programme
Please click here to see the conference programme.

Registration
To register, please complete the attached registration form and e-mail to iseasevents3@iseas.edu.sg.  
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